HAINT.BLUE

Forgotten folklore - Curious customs - Strange science - Natural anomalies - Outsider art - Haunted happenings

Stories - Videos - Photography - Artwork - Anthologies - Zines - Music

 

Haint Blue is a color. You can walk into any hardware store and pick up a can of the pale blue-green paint, which is used on the ceilings of porches to achieve that classic southern charm. What the hardware store may not tell you is that the color got its name from the Gullah people of the southeastern United States, who used it as part of their hoodoo tradition to ward off haints, boo hags, and other ghosts of the Lowcountry. While haint blue as a hue is very much still in fashion, it has lost most of its superstitious significance. We paint our porch ceilings blue, but we don't remember why. What else don't we remember or are we in the process of forgetting?

COLLECTIVE
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THE THIRTEEN CLUB

Founded in 1882 to battle unfounded superstitions, this recently resurrected society continues to celebrate all things unlucky and publishes a semi-annual zine on each Friday the 13th of the calendar year.

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DEAD OF WINTER

Dark tales from dark history by a group of writers and artists who call themselves The Dead of Winter. This collective published a series of books full of true-crime, true-horror, and all-around weirdness.

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NAZCA BIRD

Rogue graffiti project by an underground folk artist, sending unique guerrilla art pieces crisscrossing the nation.

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BEACH CREEPER

Your new favorite surf-punk band about monsters and cryptids.